Walter F. Lachman

Walther is the husband of my 2x great aunt Sophie. I don’t have much to add to last week’s blog about Sophie. There are few records for Walter before 1927. He worked as a machinist for Buffalo Forge Company most of his life. Nothing I found showed records of parents or siblings. There are some trees online that show parents and half siblings but they have no records attached.

He was Naturalized in New York District Court on February 11, 1930. His WWII draft registration lists him as 145 pounds with brown eyes and hair and light brown complexion.

A local Polish Newspaper does have a small article where Walter Lachman received a suspended sentence for attacking Boleslaw Michalski at his residence at 38 Lombard St.. There was nothing stating a motive or how they knew each other.

He died July 28, 1964 less than a year later Sophie joined him.

Sources:

Sophie Switkowski Lachman

Sophie Switkowski was born in 1906 in Buffalo, NY. Her parents were Ludwika and Wladyslaw Switkowski. I wrote about them already so Sophie’s childhood in Buffalo’s east side on her parent’s posts. Sophie is my 2x great aunt.

At age 20 she was living at 50 Lombard with her parents while working as a housekeeper. By 1928 she moved to 29 Detroit St. and worked as a box maker. It was June 12, 1928 when Sophie married Walter Lachman. Walter was born in 1905 in Poland and arrived in the US at age 7 in 1912.

Sophie and Walter moved to 77 Gibson by 1930 and had new born Irene. Three years later they added son Raymond to the family. By 1940 they moved about 2 blocks to 80 Clark St. By 1951 they were at 119 Young St. until they died. Walter died July 28, 1964, 10 months later May 31, 1965 Sophie joined her husband

Sources:

  • Year: 1910; Census Place: Buffalo Ward 8, Erie, New York; Roll: T624_942; Page: 22B; Enumeration District: 0073; FHL microfilm: 1374955
  • Year: 1920; Census Place: Buffalo Ward 10, Erie, New York; Roll: T625_1102; Page: 29B; Enumeration District: 81
  • Ancestry.com. U.S., City Directories, 1822-1995 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.
  • Year: 1930; Census Place: Buffalo, Erie, New York; Page: 8A; Enumeration District: 0063; FHL microfilm: 2341160
  • Year: 1940; Census Place: Buffalo, Erie, New York; Roll: m-t0627-02826; Page: 2B; Enumeration District: 64-119
  • New York State Department of Health; Albany, NY, USA; New York State Marriage Index
  • New York State Department of Health; Albany, NY, USA; New York State Death Index

Bruno Osmanski

Bruno Osmanski was born August 29, 1893 in Buffalo, New York. His parents were Anthony and
Antonina, both born in Poland. In 1900 his siblings were Teofil 10, Francis 7, Bernard 4 and Clara 1. The lived at 292 Detroit Street in what was then part of Buffalo’s Polonia.

Between 1900 and 1905 Bruno’s grandmother Catherine Osmanski and uncle Frank Osmanski moved in with the family. Siblings Edward 4 and Cycylia 1 were born into the family

In 1910 Bruno and family were living on Goodyear Avenue. His paternal grandmother was gone, I don’t know her death date. His maternal grandmother Katharine Makolinska was now living with them. His uncle Frank had moved out but new siblings Sophia 4 and Anthony Jr. 2 joined the rest. The family of 11 were all together in a small east side home. Bruno was working as a helper in a machine shop, I haven’t found a specific company.

He was living at 14 Newton St. in 1913. He was working as a laborer. Two years later he was at 43 Newton St. working as a helper at a machine shop.

Military records show he signed up on May 24, 1918. In June 1919 he was stationed at Headquarters Company, Field Training Depot, Marine Barracks, Quantico.

In 1920 Bruno was back with his family now living on Miller Avenue a couple blocks away from their old home on Goodyear. Francis and Bernard had moved out by this time. Later on September 21, 1920 Bruno married Leonardo Owsian. My great great aunt Antonia Gulczewski was married to Stanislaw Owsian, Leonardo was their daughter.

Bruno was back living with his parents and a couple siblings but not his wife. I don’t see her on the 1930 census and her grave stone shows her maiden name. In July 1932 his father Anthony died. A year later Bruno was living at 501 Broadway St. with Laura Osmanski. This could be Leonardo but I haven’t found records to show for sure. In July Bruno followed his father.

Sources:

  • New York Department of Health; Albany, NY; NY State Death Index
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 01 February 2021), memorial page for Bruno Osmanski (unknown–unknown), Find a Grave Memorial no. 112943499, citing Saint Stanislaus Roman Catholic Cemetery, Cheektowaga, Erie County, New York, USA ; Maintained by gravefinderStStans (contributor 47637865) .
  • Ancestry.com. U.S., Find a Grave Index, 1600s-Current [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.
  • City of Buffalo; Buffalo, NY; Index to Deaths in Buffalo, New York
  • New York State Department of Health; Albany, NY, USA; New York State Marriage Index
  • Ancestry.com. U.S., Veterans Administration Master Index, 1917-1940 [database on-line]. Lehi, UT. USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2019.
  • The National Archives at Washington, DC. USA
  • Ancestry.com. New York, U.S., Abstracts of World War I Military Service, 1917-1919 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2013.
  • Registration State: New York; Registration County: Erie
  • Year: 1900; Census Place: Buffalo Ward 9, Erie, New York; Page: 1; Enumeration District: 0070; FHL microfilm: 1241026
  • Year: 1910; Census Place: Buffalo Ward 12, Erie, New York; Roll: T624_944; Page: 10A; Enumeration District: 0108; FHL microfilm: 1374957
  • Year: 1920; Census Place: Buffalo Ward 16, Erie, New York; Roll: T625_1105; Page: 12A; Enumeration District: 127
  • Ancestry.com. U.S., City Directories, 1822-1995 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.
  • New York State Archives; Albany, New York; State Population Census Schedules, 1905; Election District: E.D. 04; City: Buffalo Ward 11; County: Erie; Page: 10
  • Year: 1930; Census Place: Buffalo, Erie, New York; Page: 15B; Enumeration District: 0132; FHL microfilm: 2341161
  • New York State Archives; Albany, New York; State Population Census Schedules, 1915; Election District: 04; Assembly District: 06; City: Buffalo Ward 10; County: Erie; Page: 83

John G. Haefner

John George Haefner is the father-in-law of my great-granduncle, or great great uncle as some would call him.

I couldn’t find any good records of his childhood or his parents so we will jump to 1900 when he is 33 and married. He was born in Germany. John also went by his middle name George. He married Kunigunda Nenner in 1892. In 1900 they were living at 217 Herman Street with children: John 6, George 5, Margaret 3, Frank 2, Joseph 4/12. The home on Herman street looks as if it has not been taken care of since they lived there.

Five years later the family was 7 children; John 12, George 10, Margaret 8, Frank 6, Joseph 4, Kathrine 2, William 1.

In 1910 John was a Miller for a Malter. The family moved to 230 Leopere St. The had 8 children John 17, George 15, Margarette 14, Frank 12, Joseph 9, Katharine 8, William 6, and newest addition Henry 2. The home is now an empty field.

No major changes to the family in the 1915 New York State Census. By 1920 son John was no longer in the home, he had married and moved out. In 1925 John and Kunigunda only had William
20 and Henry 17 still living with them. Three years later John would be the one to leave for good.

Sources:

  • New York State Archives; Albany, New York; State Population Census Schedules, 1925; Election District: 05; Assembly District: 05; City: Buffalo Ward 15; County: Erie; Page: 9
  • Ancestry.com. New York, U.S., State Census, 1892 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.
  • Ancestry.com. New York, U.S., Erie County Census 1855, 1865, 1875 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011. This collection was indexed by Ancestry World Archives Project contributors.
  • Year: 1910; Census Place: Buffalo Ward 11, Erie, New York; Roll: T624_944; Page: 3B; Enumeration District: 0105; FHL microfilm: 1374957
  • Year: 1920; Census Place: Buffalo Ward 15, Erie, New York; Roll: T625_1103; Page: 14A; Enumeration District: 117
  • Year: 1900; Census Place: Buffalo Ward 14, Erie, New York; Page: 14; Enumeration District: 0103; FHL microfilm: 1241028
  • New York State Archives; Albany, New York; State Population Census Schedules, 1905; Election District: E.D. 01; City: Buffalo Ward 14; County: Erie; Page: 29
  • New York State Archives; Albany, New York; State Population Census Schedules, 1915; Election District: 04; Assembly District: 06; City: Buffalo Ward 15; County: Erie; Page: 21
  • City of Buffalo; Buffalo, NY; Index to Deaths in Buffalo, New York
  • Ancestry.com. U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.

Wednesday Translated


Endowed with the Holy Sacraments, he died on Monday, March 2, 1953. The funeral took place on Saturday, March 7, from the funeral chapel of E. L. Cwikalowski, 185 Crocker Street, to the Church of St. Andrew, and then to the cemetery of St. Stanislaus B. M.

Prayer

Most merciful Jesus, through the goodness of Your Heart, deign to forgive this soul all sins, so that, through humble prayers, it may obtain Your love. Amen.

Our Father, Hail Mary, Eternal rest, etc.

Edward L. Cwikalowski

Funeral

185 Crocker St. HU. 8160

Where Was I; Tops part 1

This is another post in the Where Was I story I have been working on about the jobs I’ve had over the years. I have added part 1 to this topic because I ended up working at Tops 2 different times.

Tops is a local chain of supermarkets in the Buffalo and Niagara Falls area. It has a long history starting in the 1920s and expanded over the years. Some history of the company can be found here. I started at the Broadway Bailey location at 1770 Broadway in May of 1988. I had less then 2 months of high school left at the time. This location is on old railroad property. At one time the Pullman car company was located on this site. Frontier yard once part of the New York Central RR now CSX is next door.

This is a roundhouse from the old railroad days still standing behind the store.

I started out working 4 hours on week days and 8 hours Saturday and Sunday. The job was stocking sale items and weekends PBS; Pop Beer Snacks. Originally, I was only supposed to work 20 hours a week because of school; and after summer I was scheduled to go to SUNY at Buffalo for electrical engineering. This didn’t last. Within weeks I was up to 40 hour weeks and in the summer way over. I was schedule 7pm to 11pm week nights but regularly worked until 2am. I didn’t have a car yet and would get a ride home from the night manager.

After summer when college started I still still kept over 40 hours a week. Between not liking the large class sizes of UB and liking the money I dropped out of school and stayed at Tops. I was given full time and worked closer to 50 hours a week. Besides stocking shelves I was on display crew. That is the 2 person group that built the giant front displays for the weekly sales. It was an overnight shift Saturday into Sunday. One of the best parts of the job was clean up Sunday morning, opening the back door after being stuck inside all night and getting to see a Sunrise.

In 1989 the Health and Beauty Care manager and the Specialty Foods manager transferred out. The Specialty Foods manager was the assistant to HBC manager. At that time between the 2 departments there was only 80 hours available. After several months The 2 of us were able to clean up our respective departments and increase sales. I left the assistant HBC position because I was able to get over 40 hours budgeted just for Specialty Foods. A few months more and sales were good enough for a part time assistant. We ended up getting a new store manager that did not have the skills as the previous manager. I asked to go back to overnights. Not long after that I left for Freezer Queen.

One of the dairy department clerks was a high school classmate, so was his girlfriend (now wife). In August of 1989 she brought her coworker from rival grocery store Wegmans to Tops and set me up on a blind date. We married 1 year later.

Where Was I; Community Paper

In 1985 a friend’s mom asked me to help deliver a community newspaper for the democratic common council member representing our neighborhood. We were paid two cents a delivered paper. The entire council district needed to be covered in a weekend. We did this for about three months, one edition per month. It actually wasn’t bad money, Buffalo had more people back then so more papers to deliver.

Due to gerrymandering and shifting population the district has changed since the 80s. At first it was Broadway-Fillmore and Genesee-Moselle but added Allentown, the lower West Side, part of the waterfront and Marine Drive, Larkinville, the old First Ward over years. That same councilman I worked for was still in office in 2019. Finally he was replaced this last election. It was sad watching the neighborhood fall apart and see the same leader elected for 32 years.

Where Was I; Summer Youth

This is my second Where Was I post. This job was with the Buffalo Mayor’s Summer Youth Program, I was assigned to work at Dom Polski. Back in 1984 Dom Polski (Polish Home) was the Polish Cultural Center at 1081 Broadway in the Polish east side. The lower level had J. C. Mazur Gallery, the two upper levels were a large stage with the seating area used as a gym. Above that was an area for a game room with a pool table and air hockey.

From the end of June to the end of August 1984 I worked supervising kids; usually in the game room. The weird part of the job is about half of the kids I supervised were my age or older. Monday through Friday from 8:30 am to 3:30pm the upstairs was open to kids from the city. Usually only kids from the neighborhood showed up. Every day at noon the game room and gym closed for an hour for the summer lunch program. Anyone under 18 in New York State is eligible for a free lunch during the summer. I was assigned to inventory leftovers for the state. Certain items could be given out within the week and had to be accounted for.

The job was relatively easy and only a ten minute walk from home. It is odd that minimum wage at the time was only $3.35. Amazing that was considered a living wage.

Source:

Alex Jarmakowski

When I started working on this prayer card I didn’t realize that this was extended family. Alex married my great grandfather’s sister.

Alex Jarmakowski was born July 10, 1902 in Buffalo, New York. His parents were Joseph and
Catherine Jarmakowski. Joseph was born in Posen, Poland and Catherine was born in New York. In 1910 they were living on Gibson Street in the East Side ‘Polonia’ section of Buffalo. Added to the family was Sophie born in 1908. Catherine was pregnant in 1910.

Florence is joined the family in 1910 and is on the 1915 New York Census. The family of five are still living on Gibson Street.

In 1920 seventeen year old Alex is still living with the family on Gibson Street. He is working as an errand boy at a shoe store. Four years later he is a steamfitter. A year after they are still living at 127 Gibson. Josephine Jarmakowski aged 65 is now living with the family. I am assuming this is Joseph’s mother. There is a 15 year age difference so it is possible, she isn’t listed properly on the 1925 census.

Living at Gibson Street in 1930 is Joseph, Kathrine, Alex, and Florence. Alex is working as an oiler at a round house. The nearest roundhouse at this time would have been near Bailey and Broadway about a mile away. Below is a picture I took in 2008. This is what is left of a turntable from the Pullman Car Company behind Tops Markets at 1770 Broadway near Bailey.

Alex is married to Anna Switkowski in 1934 and living at 387 Gibson Street. Alex is a laborer.

Alex and Anna were living on Sears Street about three blocks away from Gibson in 1940. Alex was a laborer with the New York Central Railroad. In February 1942 Alex registered for the draft at age 39. I have no records that show him joining the military.

By 1951 the couple was living at 103 Mills Street this is about two blocks away from Gibson Street. This was his final home before his death in 1957. He is buried in Plot section A in the Saint Stanislaus Roman Catholic Cemetery Cheektowaga, Erie County, New York.

Source:

  • Year: 1940; Census Place: Buffalo, Erie, New York; Roll: m-t0627-02826; Page: 15B; Enumeration District: 64-110
  • Ancestry.com. U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 30 August 2020), memorial page for Aleksy Jarmakowski (1902–1957), Find a Grave Memorial no. 111662475, citing Saint Stanislaus Roman Catholic Cemetery, Cheektowaga, Erie County, New York, USA ; Maintained by gravefinderStStans (contributor 47637865) .
  • New York State Department of Health; Albany, NY, USA; New York State Death Index
  • New York State Archives; Albany, New York; State Population Census Schedules, 1925; Election District: 05; Assembly District: 05; City: Buffalo Ward 10; County: Erie; Page: 17
  • Year: 1920; Census Place: Buffalo Ward 10, Erie, New York; Roll: T625_1102; Page: 5A; Enumeration District: 81
  • New York State Archives; Albany, New York; State Population Census Schedules, 1915; Election District: 05; Assembly District: 06; City: Buffalo Ward 10; County: Erie; Page: 24
  • Ancestry.com. U.S., World War II Draft Cards Young Men, 1940-1947 [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.
  • Year: 1930; Census Place: Buffalo, Erie, New York; Page: 8A; Enumeration District: 0064; FHL microfilm: 2341160
  • Ancestry.com. U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 31 August 2020), memorial page for Aleksy Jarmakowski (1902–1957), Find a Grave Memorial no. 111662475, citing Saint Stanislaus Roman Catholic Cemetery, Cheektowaga, Erie County, New York, USA ; Maintained by gravefinderStStans (contributor 47637865) .
  • Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.

Jakob Gulczewski

PC Jacob Gulczewski

If you follow me on twitter you may recognize the Jakob Gulczewski.  Or you may have seen the picture below as my avatar on many social media.

Jakob was born in Poland around 1853. He immigrated in 1878, two years later he was living at 377 Peckham in Buffalo, New York. He was married to Catharina 42. Their children are Anthony 4 and Vicanty 2. Jakob was a laborer.

In the 1892 New York Census the family is now Jacob and Katarzyna with children; Anthony 13,
Vincent 13, Lawrence 9, and Mary 7. Anthony and Vincent are listed as born in Poland.

In 1899 Jakob was granted a permit to build a dwelling at 12 Newton Street. This is significant because my great grandmother was born in December of 1899 at 12 Newton Street.

Newton Street permit

The 1900 US Census shows Jakob a day laborer owned 12 Newton without a Mortgage. Jakob and Katarzyna were married 25 years. Their children still in the home were Vincent 21, Lawrence 17,
Mary 15, Stanislawa 7, Albert 5, Ignatz 2, and Johanna 11/12.

Jacob
Photo of Jacob found in the attic of 18 Newton Street in 1980

In 1910 they were still living at 12 Newton Street. Jakob worked as a laborer at the coal dock. The census says he was a naturalized citizen. Still at home were Stanislawa 17, Albert 15, Ignatz 12, and Johanna 11, and Jozefa 8. At 59 he still had school age children living at home.

Sometime before 1914 the family moved to 316 Curtiss Street. This home was at the end of the block an a quick right turn.

1920 shows them still at Curtiss Street. Adalbert 24, Ignace 22, and Joanna 20 were still living at home. Five years later Jakob died at age 72. He was buried at Saint Stanislaus Cemetery plot Sec N. The home on Curtiss Street was demolished within a coupe years as it was on the location of the soon to be constructed New York Grand Central Terminal in Buffalo that opened in April of 1929.

316 Curtis Street as seen today. The home would have been where the side road enters the building.

Source:

  • Family photo collection
  • Year: 1880; Census Place: Buffalo, Erie, New York; Roll: 829; Page: 454B; Enumeration District: 136
  • Year: 1900; Census Place: Buffalo Ward 11, Erie, New York; Page: 35; Enumeration District: 0085; FHL microfilm: 1241027
  • Year: 1910; Census Place: Buffalo Ward 8, Erie, New York; Roll: T624_942; Page: 6B; Enumeration District: 0075; FHL microfilm: 1374955
  • Ancestry.com. U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 18 August 2020), memorial page for Jakob Golczewski (1853–6 Dec 1925), Find a Grave Memorial no. 125430642, citing Saint Stanislaus Roman Catholic Cemetery, Cheektowaga, Erie County, New York, USA ; Maintained by gravefinderStStans (contributor 47637865) .
  • Ancestry.com. New York, State Census, 1892 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.
  • City of Buffalo; Buffalo, NY; Index to Deaths in Buffalo, New York
  • Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.
  • Buffalo Building Permits Index, 1887-1906
  • Buffalo, New York, City Directory, 1881
  • Year: 1920; Census Place: Buffalo Ward 10, Erie, New York; Roll: T625_1102; Page: 24B; Enumeration District: 80